Wednesday, October 12, 2005

What's a do-rag?

Since several of you didn't know what a do-rag is, I'm posting some pictures.  You can fashion one out of a bandana handkerchief, or you can buy ready-made ones at biker shops (that's the more expensive solution).

If I wear a do-rag under my helmet, my hair will still be flattened, but I can leave the rag on my head when I take off my helmet so nobody will realize how flattened my hair is.  They'll just be thinking, "What is that old woman doing with a do-rag on her head?  Going through her second childhood?"

They'd be right except for one thing:  I've never left my first childhood yet; nor do I intend to. 

13 comments:

madcobug said...

Glad to know what a do rag is. That should look good with your leathers. Maybe you can make one the same color. Helen

cyandfayedavis said...

Too cool....Too cool... We should NEVER grow up.  You have made my day!

tc01hm said...

Just remember that when you take off the do-rag and music starts, you will then have a do-da rag to 2nd line where ever and what ever you are celebrating.

2nd lining is a custom in New Orleans. Imagine a Conga line with people joyfully dancing and waving their do-da rags in time to music and heading somewhere in a group. Of course the do-da rag originated as a hanky to wipe tears during a jazz funeral and then a banner to wave in honor of the deceased meeting his or her maker.

Here's hoping you enjoyed some trivia and a custom that you can indulge at an apropriate time.
Tess :-)

lacaza3 said...

My dad said in the old days do rags were used for when you were out on your bike and had to doo doo  you used the rags  I said gross dad
Donna In TEXAS

marainey1 said...

Way back when, I'm not sure exactly the year, they were a fad. Now they are for necessity.  I know a lot of the guys that work for us wear one.  They even put them under their baseball caps, because of the work we do I suppose it helps keep their hair clean.  I tie one on when I mow the yard in the summer - it serves a dual purpose - because I need a sweat band too!  It does sound like you're having fun ! Enjoy!!! 'On Ya' - ma

pjsdolls said...

I was introduced to the world of Harleys and do-rags this year when I met my donor family.  They are all Harley riders and of couse wear do-rags.  :)  In fact, one of them took me for a ride on their Harley when I was visiting them in July.  They even decked me out with all the "gear."  It was great fun, so I know you're having a blast!  Blessings, PJ

bnanajm said...

What about the bandana FM gave us in Dallas?

siennastarr said...

I thought that's what it was, I just had never heard it called a do-rag before.  Although, I must say, the name is totally appropriate for what it does! :)

Thanks Mosie
Jackie

tendernoggle said...

Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:-)
love ya,
carlene

vortexgirl said...

I'm not sure if there is a difference but it's also called a babushka.  
1 a : a usually triangularly folded kerchief for the head b : a head covering resembling a babushka
2 : an elderly Russian woman
I of course couldn't find the difinition for do-rag but I think they are the same.

plieck30 said...

Woops I almost missed this and then I would have never known. I like the red, white and blue one, but I don't think they would go too well with a cowboy hat. Thanks I really did want to know this, Paula

sam7md2 said...

I wore bandanas all the time when I was a young girl.  I wore them around my head in all kinds of ways including the do-rag style.  I've even got a picture of me with my hair up in pincurls and a bandana wrapped around my head, but I don't have a scanner to show you what I mean.  I'm sure those of you who were born in the 30's know what I'm talking about.  We thought it was fashionable at the time.

Never give up being a child, Mosie....Love your spirit......Sam

butanelsp said...

Doo Rags were invented by black slaves in early America. Originally they were called Dew Rags or Du Rags because the slaves laid them out overnight to collect dew so that they would have something cool to wear on their heads as they worked the fields.